All posts tagged: asian

Crunchy salad mix – Nepalese style

I’ve got no name for this dish. But it’s my mum making and its super yum. And best of all, its so easy. What you need: 1 cup julienned carrots 1/2 cup julienned white raddish 2 cup chopped cabbage 1/2 cup chopped onions 1/2 cup chopped tomatoes 1/3 cup chopped coriander 1/3 cup peas 1/2 lemon 1 tblspoon fenugreek seeds 1 tblspoon sesame seeds 1 tblspoon sweet chilli sauce 2 fresh green chillies chilli powder salt Preparation Soak the fenugreek seeds overnight. Dry roast the sesame seeds and grind it on a pestle. Then mix all the ingredients together, squeeze some lemon, salt and chilli powder to get some kick in. Then toss. That’s it! Fresh as spring! This would be perfect to go alongside a bbq or grill.  

Methi ko Achaar

My mum is currently over in Australia living with us for a few months. And while she is having a ball taking care of her first granddaughter, I am trying to take advantage of her presence in my kitchen and take note of any of her Nepalese/Newari cooking. This particular pickle doesnt just burst with flavours, it literally explodes! And a big hit on the table. As with most of the Nepalese recipes on this site, I warn you, its not for the faint hearted as this one is spicy!  (My Nepalese brothers and sisters craving for more spice, you are welcome 😀 ) Here we go: Roast & grind the seeds: 1 tablespoon fenugreek seeds 1/2 teaspoon thyme seeds 1/2 teaspoon sesame seeds Roast them all and grind them in a pestle Heat 1 tablespoon oil in frying pan. To that, add in 3 cloves of garlic and about a 1cm of garlic sliced, 3 dried chillies broken into small pieces, a pinch of turmeric. Remove from heat, once the garlic is slightly charred. (Keep your exhaust …

Homemade Nepalese raddish pickle – Not for the faint hearted

So this is a raddish pickle often found in most Nepalese kitchen. If you cannot stand spice the smell of radish, or have a sensitive stomach, this is definitely not for you. I prepared this pickle following a couple of recipes online (see links below). I will have to admit the output was nothing close to my grandma’s pickle but not bad for a first attempt. And this “not-so-perfect” output has nothing to do with the recipes I followed but it was more because of I believe I didn’t go right with the proportion of ingredients I used. I hope to perfect it in my second attempt but here is how I went anyway: Ingredients: 700gms of radish – peeled and thick julienne cut 3 green chillies – cut lengthwise 2 tablespoons of roasted sesame seeds (I actually used 4 spoons of sesame and that was a bad, bad decision. I know I should have halved this) 1 tablespoon of turmeric powder 2 tablespoon of chilli powder 4 cloves of garlic, thinly sliced. And the same amount …

‘Goldbera ko Achaar’ – my new found love

I miss my mom’s home cooked Nepalese food. In several attempts to be like her… I have earned myself the title of a ‘disaster chef’. But I am getting better at this… for real. A typical Nepalese dinner of rice & curry is usually accompanied by ‘Goldbera ko Achaar’ which directly translates as Tomato Pickle. But its not really a pickle since its not fermented. In fact, its more of a salsa since its a fresh mix of tomato with herbs and spices, with a Nepalese twist of course. And this ‘goldbera ko achaar’ is my new found love. I thought I would share this – especially for my sister – and all those that miss the feel of a typical Nepalese dinner. Get your ingredients together: 2 ripe medium sized tomatoes. 1 small/medium old whiting fish (optional). 3 red chillies. 4 cloves of garlic. about 10-15 stalks of coriander (or as you like it). 1/2 a medium sized lemon. Roast them: The tomatoes – Cut up the tomatoes into 5 pieces each and grill them on …

Tofu and Shiitake Mushroom Stir-Fry

Making a vegetarian dish is always a challenge in our kitchen. And being so accustomed to preparing spicy Nepalese food, creating a dish that does not use loads of turmeric, or cumin or loads of chillies is also always a challenge. But I nailed this particular dish without the heavy use of the usual himalayan spices. This was the tofu and shiitake mushroom stir fry recipe that I found on the bon appetit website. To be honest, this was my second attempt. (Let’s not remember how the first attempt went… *sigh*) I don’t think its worth detailing the recipe again as I followed the method word to to word on this site: http://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/stir-fried-tofu-and-shiitake-mushrooms-in-spicy-black-bean-sauce I followed the recipe ditto except: used 950gm *3 gms of regular firm tofu doubled the rest of the ingredients forgot the leek also forgot the cilantro, so added some baby peas for some ‘color’. The name of the recipe says “spicy” but honestly it wasn’t. My 4 year old nephew ate it without hesitation. I had guests ask me for the recipe, so seems like it was …

Remake of a Nepalese favourite

I have no English name for this. Its basically a spicy yoghurt mix of pomelo and various oranges/mandarins and is a Nepalese favourite. It sounds a like a weird choice of ingredients but it’s awesome for those sunny lazy afternoon cravings. Fresh, tangy and yumm. … of course, that is if you like spicy. Pomelos are either hard to find or are super expensive in Sydney. So this is a ‘remake’ with only mandarins. Peel & cut 2 naval oranges/blood oranges into bite size pieces. To the oranges, add a teaspoon of salt, chilli powder, a spoon of sugar and then yoghurt. I used Jalna’s sweet and creamy yoghurt (this yoghurt is to die for!!).  In a small frying pan, heat about 1.5 spoon of oil. Once the oil has heated, add about half a teaspoon of turmeric powder and fenugreek seeds. Wait until the fenugreek seeds have turned dark brown. Remove from heat and pour the heated oil into the orange mix. Then mix the whole thing together well. Add chilli/salt/sugar as per liking. And try it …

Nepal is Shaken but not Broken.

I was in Nepal recently – in the capital city. The devastation caused by the quake was heartbreaking but the vibe in Kathmandu is not one of sorrow. Life is bouncing back – at least in the capital. Schools are running. Offices are open. Businesses are open. Sure there are are families whose lives will never be the same. But most have just picked up the pieces left behind and moved on. I took a whole bunch of photos and videos while I was there but unfortunately I lost all the data on my phone – an incident I will probably regret for a long looong loooong time. Here are a few that I shared with my friends that I was able to re-collect: We did not get to venture out beyond the Kathmandu Valley. The monsoon rain was causing more havoc. So I cannot say about the situation beyond the capital city. I read that help has still not reached remote areas. Life there would be completely different. But there are so many local grassroots organisations …

Nepali Dhaka

Bringing some life to our hallway with Nepalese ‘dhaka’

In the hilly regions of Eastern Nepal, women weave this gorgeous fabric called “Dhaka”, using traditional handlooms. I love the fabric for its uniqueness and beautiful patterns. While this is mainly used for making traditional clothing in Nepal, I thought I would frame it up (it deserves to be framed) and bring some life & charm to our otherwise boring hallway 😉  I had this piece of fabric specially ordered from Nepal and have carefully framed it. I’m loving it so far. Can’t wait to hang it up.

Nepalese chicken curry

Nepalese Chicken Curry

I am often asked what a typical Nepalese meal is like. And my answer is simple – Lots of rice and curry, needless to say with lots of spices. I thought I would share this Nepalese style chicken that I made for dinner today and is quite a regular one in every Nepalese kitchen. What you need: 6 chicken drumsticks – skin removed, each chopped into 3 pieces, washed and drained 1 large onion – sliced 1 large tomato – sliced 1 cup green peas 1/2 cup carrots diced Usually there is coriander to garnish but I am not too fond of it, so I never add it 🙂 2 fresh red chillies vegetable oil all the usual nepalese spices – cumin powder, chilli powder/flakes, turmeric powder How its done: Heat up a saucepan or a crockpot, add about 4 tablespoons of oil. Add a teaspoon of tumeric. Once the oil has heated add in fresh chopped chillies along with the chilli flakes (we love it hot!) and the onions as well. Then goes in …

Tangy Nepalese Potato Salad

A tangy Nepalese potato salad

This is one of my favourite Nepalese dishes. It’s a tangy/spicy potato salad that is pretty popular in my kitchen. Works great as a side dish to a protein. And best of all, so easy to prepare 😀 I prepared this recently and thought to share. P.S. I am also practising my photography. Then put all the ingredients into a mixing bowl. Heat about 4/5 tablespoons of oil and add about 1.5 teaspoon of turmeric powder, 2 teaspoons of fennel seeds some chilli flakes. Remove from heat, just as the fennel seeds turn dark brown and pour it into the mixing bowl. Be careful not to choke on the smoke – again, I speak from many experiences of filling the kitchen in smoke… Then mix them all together with salt and fresh lemon juice. There is no right and wrong in the amount of lemon you can use. Add it according to your liking. But in my case,  I used up a full lemon. And I always like fresh baby peas too – tastes great and adds …